Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA. Credit: Min LeePhiladelphia, PA. Credit: Brian SiewiorekNassau Hall, Princeeton, NJ. Credit: Srevatsan MuralidharanVan Buren Street Bridge, Wilmington, DE. Credit: Lou Angelli Digital Imaging

Chapter News

29 January 2016

During APT-DVC's Annual Meeting (January 28th, 2016), the membership elected  two individuals to the Board of Directors:

A. Arieto Seraphin, PE, CDT (Keast & Hood Co.)

Since 2007, Ari has contributed to Keast & Hood projects as a structural engineer for historic restoration/preservation and new construction, including non-destructive testing and thermography analyses. His practical hands-on construction knowledge coupled with his engineering training serve him well in developing pragmatic structural solutions and in coordinating and communicating effectively with members of the design team and with tradespeople. Ariís experience began while at The Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades gaining skills working with Frank Furness buildings and continued with high-end interior renovations and exterior restoration work which provided him with the basis for his introduction into engineering. He has been a member of the Association for Preservation Technology for several years, and for five years served as Chairman of the Hawthorne Empowerment Coalition Zoning Board.

Courtney Magill (University of Pennsylvania)

Courtney Magill graduated from the University of Georgia with dual Bachelor of Arts degrees in art history and classical culture in 2011. She continued her research in art conservation through an internship with the Curator of Decorative Arts at the Georgia Museum of Art and an apprenticeship with a private conservator in the Athens, GA area. In the summer of 2012 she attended the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts' Summer Institute, concentrating on the decorative arts of the southern backcountry and an AIC workshop located on Ossabaw Island, GA in 2013, learning preventative preservation tactics through implementation in the Torrey Mansion. She recently completed her Master of Science in Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania in May of 2015 and received The Anthony Nicholas Brady Garvan Award for an Outstanding Thesis. Her coursework has concentrated on the theoretical, logistical, and physical approach to the conservation and preservation of historic buildings and sites, and has focused on conservation as it applies to building materials. Her thesis explored performance testing of hydrophobic and UV resistant protective treatments for the exteriors of historic log structures, and she continued her research in the summer of 2015 by constructing a natural weathering bracket on-site in Grand Teton National Park to provide real-time weathering results for these treatments. Courtney recently presented this research at the APT Conference in Kansas City and will also present it at the AIC Meeting in Montreal this May. She is currently continuing as a post-graduate fellow and a lab manager for the Architectural Conservation Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania.

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